Aeron Chair
Aeron Chair

The Aeron chair is a product of Herman Miller designed in 1994 by Don Chadwick and Bill Stumpf. It is an ergonomic chairthat is regarded by many users as inherently very comfortable due to its wide range of fit (available in three sizes) and adjustability. Its novel design has gained it a spot in the Museum of Modern Art's permanent collection.[1] The chair's exclusivity became a symbol of the dot-com bubble in the late 1990s.

The chair departs from a typical upholstery-over-cushioning-base design. Instead, the seat and back are made of a stretched, semi-transparent, and flexible mesh called Pellicle. It can be customized through modular extensions like lumbar support,sacral support (dubbed PostureFit), fixed or adjustable armrests and varied bases to accommodate diverse fields of deployment.

Bill Stumpf came up with the name Aeron which was derived from the word aeration which describes one of the comfort aspects of the mesh suspension.

In April 2010, Business Week published an article which cast doubt on the ergonomic benefits of the Aeron chair.[2] The article includes comments from Don Chadwick, who says he wasn't hired to design the ideal product for an eight-hour-workday; he was hired to update Herman Miller's previous best-seller. "We were given a brief and basically told to design the next-generation office chair," he says.